Lest we forget: Muslim Service in the Great War

Written by Chris Hill, Birmingham City University, and previously appearing on the Voices of War and Peace Blog. Reproduced with thanks.

‘Stories of Sacrifice’, an exhibition run by the British Muslim Heritage Centre about Muslim service in the First World War, was met with a note of surprise by visiting Muslims from across the UK.

Dr Islam Issa at the exhibition 'Stories of Sacrifice'
Dr Islam Issa at the exhibition ‘Stories of Sacrifice’

Dr Islam Issa, curator of the exhibition and lecturer in English at Birmingham City University, recalled how e-mails and letters from descendants of Muslim soldiers were full of gratitude, often with the qualification that ‘we didn’t think anyone cared’.

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Letters from the Holy Land: the influence of the Middle Eastern campaign in WW1 on Welsh culture and society

In this latest Guest Blog by Gethin Matthews, he talks about the imagery of the Holy Land and how middle eastern culture came ultimately to affect Welsh culture and society.

The First World War was a world-wide war which transported millions of young men away from their homes to foreign lands. Often these men sought an anchor which could help them make sense of their unfamiliar surroundings as they tried to convey their experiences to their loved ones. In the case of Welshmen who found themselves in Egypt and Palestine, they had a ready vocabulary to describe these countries which came straight from the Bible. The idea of the campaign in the ‘Holy Land’ struck a chord with newspapers and opinion-formers back in Wales, and shaped ideas which persisted with the Welsh public.

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“Banging the door on the war”: Re-visiting Robert Graves But It Still Goes On and the post-war plays of the 1920s

But It Still Goes On, 2018. With thanks to Arsalan Sattari
But It Still Goes On, 2018. With thanks to Arsalan Sattari

As Robert Graves’ forgotten 1929 play But It Still Goes ON receives its world-premiere in London,  Andrew Maunder wonders if it is time to revisit the post-war plays of the 1920s.  This latest Blog post explores this fascinating world.

Continue reading “Banging the door on the war”: Re-visiting Robert Graves But It Still Goes On and the post-war plays of the 1920s

Aspects of Representation of the People Act 1918

In our latest Blog post, Dr Nick Mansfield looks at the profound and far reaching aspects of the Representation of the People Act, 1918, outside that of women’s right to vote.

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100 miles for 100 years: First World War themed trails in Kent

“100 Miles for 100 years” has developed 37 self-guided First World War themed heritage trails for Kent, enabling local communities to actively engage with their local heritage. People can discover more about the people of the time and the impact that the First World War had on local communities in an easy to follow, interesting manner in either a digital or printed format, all of which is accessible through one portal. The variety of information is designed to engage and provide modern day relevance, not just for the enthusiast, but for people with little knowledge of the period.

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Reflections on Collaborative Projects

Dr Jim Beach Northampton University, presenting his project Secret Soldiers , The Intelligence Corps in the First World War
1. Dr Jim Beach Northampton University, presenting his project Secret Soldiers , The Intelligence Corps in the First World War

In our latest Blog post, Michael Noble takes time to reflect on Collaborative Projects.

Just before Christmas, academic and community leads from the Centre for Hidden Histories’ co-production grant scheme came together to take part in a dedicated workshop to reflect on their projects, share examples of the things that they had achieved and exchange ideas for further work. Continue reading Reflections on Collaborative Projects

‘The scene of desolation was of a most harrowing nature’: Visiting and revisiting the Western Front, 1919-39

In this post, Professor Mark Connelly examines how Western Front battlefields became places to visit – both for tourists and pilgrims – after the Great War.

Continue reading ‘The scene of desolation was of a most harrowing nature’: Visiting and revisiting the Western Front, 1919-39

Researching the First World War

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