World War One at Home – Wednesday 26th February across the BBC

BBC News Magazine and BBC Scotland has been exploring the tale of Carl Lody, a German spy who reported on British warships in the Firth of Forth in Edinburgh. Lody, who used the alias Charles Inglis, was executed at the formidable Tower of London in 1914.

On Twitter at #ww1athome, people are sharing and posting stories like the one above. BBC Shropshire’s Genevieve Tudor posted a picture of a local women’s network who organised the collection of eggs for the frontline in Much Wenlock. Comedian Johnny Vegas joined the conversation, tweeting his approval, and suggesting that the woman on the left reminded him of his paternal grandmother.

eggsphoto

In the East Midlands, it is the history of the University of Leicester that is explored by a current medical student. Soldiers injured on the front were transported to the a hospital on the site, the former County Lunatic Asylum repurposed after the outbreak.. After the war, the University was established there as a living memorial.

World War One at Home – Tuesday 25th February across the BBC

Radio Jersey have been sharing tales from a German Prisoner of War camp on Les Blanches Banques on Jersey. There were successful escape attempts, and one German prisoner would return to the island as island Commandant in World War Two.

On BBC Radio Scotland’s John Beattie Show, Dr Catriona Burness revealed the forgotten radicalism of Mary Barbour, a Govan based woman who opposed war time rent increases imposed by Glasgow landlords, and organised militant protests summoned by Mary’s football rattle.

On Radio Ulster and Radio Foyle in Northern Ireland, it is the story of the cyclist company of the 36th Ulster Division. A local bicycle shop in Omagh received an urgent order for bicycles fitted with rifle slips and the soldiers cycled through rural Northern Ireland recruiting for the war effort. Dr Timothy Bowman from the University of Kent explained.

World War One at Home – Launch Day Highlights

Across the BBC, stories from the home front were shared on local radio and news programmes to mark the launch of the World War One at Home programme. Some selected highlights of yesterday’s broadcasts included:

Professor Jane Chapman appearing on the BBC Look East to discuss the legacy of the war not only for women in the workplace, but as the birthplace of the modern twentieth century as we now understand it.

Jenny Agutter narrating the story of a child, Joan Burbidge, who corresponded with a ‘Chocolate Soldier’. After writing her name on a box of chocolates posted to British soldiers in France, Bombadier Edward Hassall exchanged letters with Joan throughout the war, although the pen pals never met.

Making traditional clothes for uniforms on BBC Radio Wales. Welsh homespun cloth used for Welsh Army Corps uniforms which was made at mills in Carmathenshire. As the war progressed, demand for the ‘brethyn llwyd’ (grey cloth) outstripped supply.

Fergus Keeling, BBC Northern Ireland’s Head of Radio, marked the launch of the programme in Northern Ireland by saying that the stories “shed light on familiar places we know and love, places right on our doorsteps”.

BBC World War One at Home Launch: Broadcast details 24-28 February

ww1athomelogoWorld War One At Home reveals how the momentous events of the war affected life on the Home Front. Around 1400 stories will be broadcast throughout 2014 and beyond, on BBC local and national radio and television, and online.

Academics and historical experts supported by the AHRC have provided time and expertise to BBC journalists and researchers, giving historical context, research leads and enabling access to local museums, organisations and specialists, who have also generously provided assets and valuable insight from their own collections.

Each World War One At Home story will be published online, and remain available indefinitely, providing an unparalleled digital archive. The stories will be organised by place (a BBC local or national radio station) or by theme (such as War in the Air, Women, Medicine, Working for the War, Sport or Animals). A range of BBC News features will bring additional insight and historical context.

Listen out for the stories from your area on your local TV and Radio stations. Find stories from across the country online, or by following #WW1AtHome. Find out more about the AHRC researchers involved in this initiative on the AHRC website.

Broadcast Details

All BBC Local Radio stations across England will broadcast a World War One At Home story at 8.15am each weekday morning, and at various times throughout the day from Monday 24 February to Friday 28 February. More World War One At Home stories will be broadcast in April and through the rest of the year.

BBC regional television news programmes in England will broadcast a World War One At Home story each weekday from 24 – 28 February at 6.30pm on BBC One. Many of the stories will feature never before seen footage of life on the Home Front.

In Scotland World War One At Home stories will be on Good Morning Scotland, the John Beattie Show and Newsdrive on BBC Radio Scotland from Monday 24 to Thursday 27 February

In Northern Ireland World War One At Home stories will be at 8.50am, 11.55am and 11.55pm on BBC Radio Ulster and BBC Radio Foyle from Monday 24 to Friday 28 February.

In Wales World War One At Homes stories will be on Eleri Sion’s programme at 3.30pm Monday 24 to Thursday 27 February and Friday 28 February on Wynne Evans’s Big Welsh Weekend at 3.30pm on BBC Radio Wales.

Changing Women’s Lives

Womans Hour WW1 GuestsProfessor Maggie Andrews appeared on BBC Radio 4 Women’s Hour, on Wednesday 5 February to discuss her research on how the war shaped the lives of a generation of women. While women in their thousands volunteered for war service and the number of women employed went up by more than a million by 1918, what power did women really achieve outside the home and how lasting was it?

Professor Andrews is a Cultural Historian at the University of Worcester is currently acting as an AHRC-funded adviser to the BBC in the West Midlands on its World War One at Home project while completing, with Janis Lomas, an edited collection entitled The Home Front: Images, Myths and Forgotten Experiences.

A full recording this programme is available on iPlayer.

ww1women

Researching the First World War

Visit Us On TwitterVisit Us On FacebookVisit Us On Google PlusVisit Us On YoutubeVisit Us On LinkedinCheck Our Feed