Reflections on Collaborative Projects

Dr Jim Beach Northampton University, presenting his project Secret Soldiers , The Intelligence Corps in the First World War
1. Dr Jim Beach Northampton University, presenting his project Secret Soldiers , The Intelligence Corps in the First World War

In our latest Blog post, Michael Noble takes time to reflect on Collaborative Projects.

Just before Christmas, academic and community leads from the Centre for Hidden Histories’ co-production grant scheme came together to take part in a dedicated workshop to reflect on their projects, share examples of the things that they had achieved and exchange ideas for further work. Continue reading Reflections on Collaborative Projects

‘The scene of desolation was of a most harrowing nature’: Visiting and revisiting the Western Front, 1919-39

In this post, Professor Mark Connelly examines how Western Front battlefields became places to visit – both for tourists and pilgrims – after the Great War.

Continue reading ‘The scene of desolation was of a most harrowing nature’: Visiting and revisiting the Western Front, 1919-39

The Zeebrugge Raid: Creating a Legend

In our latest blog Professor Mark Connelly talks about the British naval raid on Zeebrugge, which took place on 23rd April 1918, and its commemoration over time.

Continue reading The Zeebrugge Raid: Creating a Legend

Making Memory and Legacy: Virtual Archives of Conflict from WW1 to The Troubles

In this latest Blog Post, Dr Johanne Devlin Trew,  from Ulster University & the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Funded Living Legacies World War One Engagement Centre, talks all things ‘Republican Crafts’.

On Wednesday March 14, 2018, a community conference and exhibition entitled Irish Republican Prison Crafts: Making Memory and Legacy was held at Belfast’s historical Crumlin Road Gaol. It showcased the Heritage Lottery funded project of Coiste na nIarchimí [Republican ex-prisoners organisation], supported by Living Legacies, Ulster University and The Open University. The goal of the project was to create a virtual archive of conflict-related Republican prison crafts that are in the possession of prisoner families and to capture the stories surrounding these objects of memory. The project took as a model the virtual archive developed by Living Legacies to record WW1 material sourced from the general public.

Continue reading Making Memory and Legacy: Virtual Archives of Conflict from WW1 to The Troubles

100 Years in the Air – RAF Centenary

In this guest blog Dr Emma Hanna from the University of Kent talks about the formation of the RAF which recently celebrated its centenary.  Continue reading 100 Years in the Air – RAF Centenary

The Great War Theatre Project

In our latest Blog post, Dr Helen Brooks talks all things Theatre and WW1.

Dr Helen Brooks is Co-Investigator to Gateways to the First World War, an AHRC Funded WW1 Engagement Centre.

Helen is Principal Investigator of the Great War Theatre project and Co-Investigator of the Performing Centenaries project. She is a senior lecturer in Drama at the University of Kent, where she also teaches on the First World War Studies MA course in the School of History.

Hippodrome programme - Special Collections and Archives, University of Kent
Hippodrome programme – Special Collections and Archives, University of Kent

Continue reading The Great War Theatre Project

Weaving the history of First World War aeroplanes

In this guest Blog, Professor Owen Davies from the University of Hertfordshire and AHRC’s WW1 Engagement Centre ‘Everyday Lives in War’, talks about the importance of basketwork for Royal Air Force aeroplanes in this its centenary year. Continue reading Weaving the history of First World War aeroplanes

Performing Commemorations Project: Dramatic Responses to the Legacies of the First World War

On 10 February, Kurt Taroff and Michelle Young from the Arts & Humanities Research Council-funded “Living Legacies 1914-18” engagement centre, led a full-day workshop in the Brian Friel Theatre at Queen’s University Belfast. Continue reading Performing Commemorations Project: Dramatic Responses to the Legacies of the First World War

Why did Germany launch its Spring Offensive in 1918?

In this latest Blog Post, Dr. Spencer Jones, Senior Lecturer in Armed Forces & War Studies, at the University of Wolverhampton and Co-Investigator for the Arts & Humanities Research Council funded Voices of War & Peace Engagement Centre, talks about Germany’s Spring Offensive, and why they undertook it in 1918.

Continue reading Why did Germany launch its Spring Offensive in 1918?

Researching the First World War

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