Tag Archives: community

Connected Communities Festival: Performing the First World War

A number of sessions at the recent Connected Communities Festival in Cardiff reflected on the nature of community at this time of commemoration and during the First World War.

This session, ‘Performing the First World War’ explored how drama and performance can shed light on lives and legacies of the First World War.

The session focussed on creating new drama from local material and how lost plays can reveal historical experiences. Brenda Winter-Palmer (Queen’s University, Belfast) led an activity around her experience of developing a community play, The Medal in the Drawer. Dr Andrew Maunder (University of Hertfordshire) then considered how ‘lost’ plays of the First World War can explore the war, memory, and identity and give an alternative perspective on the more familiar performances of the war.

You can revisit all the sessions which were live streamed in a YouTube playlist.

Leeds Stories of the Great War

The latest film from the AHRC examines ‘Leeds Stories of the Great War’, a project undertaken by the University of Leeds that has been investigating the experiences of people who were living in Leeds during the First World War.

Leeds as a city was vital to the British war effort. It lost more men than the national average; equally, as a key industrial centre, Leeds factories and industries played an indispensable role in supplying the British troops and civilians during the war. Leeds residents also contributed in other ways: its households took in Belgian refugees; its hospitals cared for thousands of wounded soldiers from Britain (and it’s then Empire).  Today, in the Liddle Collection, University of Leeds, the West Yorkshire Archives (now in Morley), and Leeds Central Library, Leeds houses the most important collections of archival materials on the First World War outside of London.

Leeds Stories of the Great War aimed to bring together community groups with academics to explore all aspects of Leeds life during the war.  One of the ways the project delivered this was to contribute an ‘Antiques Roadshow’ style event in Morley, where members of the public had the chance to bring along photographs, letters and objects relating to the First World War, and have them put into context by academics from the University, and experts from the libraries and museums of Leeds.

For more information on Leeds Stories of the Great War please see the Legacies of War website. ​

Launch of Living Legacies 1914-1928 in Belfast

livinglegaciesThe Living Legacies 1914-1918 World War One Engagement Centre launched this week in Belfast. One of five UK-wide centres funded by the AHRC to connect academic and public histories of the First World War, the centre is a collaboration between Queen’s University Belfast, University of Ulster and National Museums Northern Ireland.

At the launch event both Vice Chancellors warmly welcomed the initiative and the collaboration, as did the NMNI’s Director Tim Cooke, with Professor Richard Grayson of Goldsmiths, University of London, giving a lecture in which he drew on his own family history to explore aspects of the history of the First World War as it impacted on Ireland.

But it was the excerpt of the play ‘The Medal in the Drawer’ by Brenda Winter-Palmer that took centre stage at the University of Ulster venue on Monday evening. Performed by second-year Creative Arts students at Queen’s University, the play charts the war-journeys of four volunteers who join up to fight with the 36th Ulster Division and the Connaught Rangers. Tensions on the streets of Belfast are never far from the minds of the protagonists as they prepare for war, questioning each other and themselves about their motivations for joining the war effort. At the end of the excerpt we saw, the spirit of death arrives to touch each of them…

It provided both an act of commemoration and an important reminder of the intimate links between the personal and the political, the past and the present, connections which the Centre will itself be exploring as it seeks to bring the academic and the public together over the coming months and years. Click here to read more about the play and the family history behind it in the Belfast Telegraph.

www.livinglegacies1914-1918.ac.uk