Tag Archives: war graves

‘The scene of desolation was of a most harrowing nature’: Visiting and revisiting the Western Front, 1919-39

In this post, Professor Mark Connelly examines how Western Front battlefields became places to visit – both for tourists and pilgrims – after the Great War.

Continue reading ‘The scene of desolation was of a most harrowing nature’: Visiting and revisiting the Western Front, 1919-39

World War One at Home – Friday 28th February across the BBC

By the fifth day, World War One at Home is starting to hit its stride as communities engage with the stories already shared, and start to share their own stories and share their views on Twitter and through phone ins.

Professor Jane Chapman (University of Lincoln), one of the AHRC-funded advisers on World War One at Home, appeared on BBC Radio Cambridge for a phone in debate about WW1’s legacy and if and how it should be taught in schools. You can listen again online to the thought-provoking discussion – it starts from 1h06m20s. This debate topically follows on from the media furore around ‘left wing myths’ about WW1.

Roger Deeks (University of Birmingham), another AHRC-funded adviser on World War One appeared on the morning show on BBC Radio Gloucestershire who surveyed some of the things that have already come out of the series there. You can listen again online to Roger’s discussion of the Gloucestershire stories – it starts from 2h36m50s. One local story reveals how a man from Amberley worked to improve how the dead were recorded and how their graves were maintained – Fabian Ware, one man, responsible for the dignified resting places of many thousands of fallen troops.

As World War One at Home continues through this centenary year, many more poignant stories like this will be revealed, and many more debates on the legacy of the conflict will be had. For now, it is clear that after just one week, many radio listeners and television audiences in the UK think differently about their locale and its place in the First World War.